#BookReview The Ghosts of Manor House by Matt Powers

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Goodreads Synopsis:

Edmund and Mary Wilder are very much in love. But the death of their young son, Tommy, has shattered their family. Edmund is determined to bring them back together, drawing on the only bit of strength he has left—his love for Mary and their daughter, Stephanie. But Mary sinks deeper into depression while little Stephanie’s anger grows. Edmund flounders in his attempts to rescue his family from the brink of collapse and doesn’t know where to turn.

Then Mary receives an invitation for the family to become guests at Manor House, a seemingly quaint Bed and Breakfast. This, she assures her husband, is the answer to all their troubles.

Edmund arrives ahead of his family to spend a couple days working on his long-delayed novel. But his growing curiosity about the old house leads Edmund to an encounter that will change him forever.

What will you sacrifice for love?

An old fashioned psychological thriller with a nod to Stephen King, Manor House will keep you guessing and compel you to turn the page to the very end.

A mother will sacrifice anything for her children. A husband will risk everything to save his wife. Manor House will take them all

My review:

I won a copy of Ghosts of Manor House from author, Matt Powers in exchange for a review but this does not influence my review, all opinions are my own.

I really enjoyed Ghosts of Manor House. It’s the type of ghost story that works in a psychological way playing to your greatest fears: the fear of a child dying, the fear of your family, sister, children being in danger. The prologue captured my attention immediately and the epilogue likewise was excellent. Altogether, a very readable book written in an appealing style with no flowery language or gimmicks. It is simply a good book packed in a remarkably small package! Definitely recommended reading.

My rating: 4 stars.

I was so engrossed reading Ghosts of Manor House that I started seeing ghosts and creepy things in my mug. I shared a few photos on Instagram but this one is the one that really freaked me out the most…

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See what I mean! When this happens it’s kind of weird but in a WOW this book is really affecting me way! Can you see the face in the mug? Those fingers? That hand? Or can you see something else?

Beware! Ghosts of Manor House might have unexpected spooky effects on the residue of your tea!

Check out: https://www.ghostsofmanorhouse.com/

Have you read Ghosts of Manor House? Are you going to? Dare you to!

Bye for now….

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My Social Media:

Authors Website: https://mjmallon.com

Collaborative blog: https://sistersofthefey.wordpress.com

Twitter: @Marjorie_Mallon and @curseof_time

My Facebook Authors/Bloggers Support Group:

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Colleens Weekly Poetry Challenge No: 76

A delight tricks us,

My Tanka for Colleen’s weekly poetry challenge using the synonyms delight for Joy and passion for fury.

I find dreams fascinating. Often we wish we could continue our dream when the alarm rings to wake us up. But, if the dream becomes a nightmare we are only to keen for it to end! Would this dream be a nightmare I wonder…

Here’s the link to join in with Colleen’s weekly poetry challenge:

https://colleenchesebro.com/2018/03/20/colleens-2018-weekly-tanka-tuesday-poetry-challenge-no-76-joy-fury/

Hope you liked my Tanka!

Bye for now. Happy dreaming!

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Social Media:

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Buy Book: myBook.to/TheCurseofTime

Authors Website: https://mjmallon.com

Collaborative blog: https://sistersofthefey.wordpress.com

Twitter: @Marjorie_Mallon and @curseof_time

Join our Facebook Authors/Bloggers Support Group:

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Blog Tour for ‘Violet’ by Leslie Tate

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A big welcome to my guest Leslie… author of the trilogy of novels ‘Purple’, ‘Blue’ and ‘Violet’, as well as his trans memoir ‘Heaven’s Rage.’

VIOLET – THE INSIDE STORY

Violet Front Cover

When I interview authors on my blog https://leslietate.com/ about their new novel I usually begin with who they are, a few words about their new title, then questions about what kind of writing they do. I follow up with how their life experiences have contributed to their book, how it changed in the making, and why they’ve written it. I’m just as interested in the process as the result, so I might include questions about their writing habits, what fires them up and who they read and why.

I interview a wide range of people, not just authors. So I talk to musicians, artists, filmmakers, publishers, comedians, care-givers and people with disabilities or mental health issues – anyone who has to use imagination in one form or another to get by. I want to learn about them as people and how the act of doing something difficult has changed them, in themselves and in their view of the world. I also want to grasp the inflow and outflow of energy and imagination as well as the hard graft that went into what they’re creating.

So, with the tables turned, interviewing myself (as authors do, turning snatches of fantasy and overheard voices into polished monologues) – can I deliver even half of what I hope to get from them?

It’s a bit like playing God, but here goes…

Q: What’s your writing history?

A: I studied Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia, I’ve been shortlisted for the Bridport, Geoff Stevens and Wivenhoe Prizes and I’m the author of the trilogy of novels ‘Purple’, ‘Blue’ and ‘Violet’, as well as my trans memoir ‘Heaven’s Rage’, which has been turned into a film.

Q: Tell us about your latest book.

A: The blurb for my recently-published novel ‘Violet’ runs like this: ‘The passionate, late-life love of Beth and James begins in 2003 on a blind date in a London restaurant. Attracted by James’s openness, Beth feels an immediate, deep connection between his honesty and her own romantic faith. From then on they bond, exchanging love-texts, exploring sea walks and gardens and sharing their past lives with flashbacks to Beth’s rural childhood and her marriage to a dark, charismatic minister…’

Q: What kind of writing do you do?

A: My published writing is about the changing patterns of modern love. It grows out of language – I constantly search for the right word to guide me to the next. My plots develop from the characters: what they say, how they interact and what lies deepest inside them.

Q: How do you approach the task of writing a novel?

A: When I write, I need to find the exact turn of phrase to get started. So I listen carefully as I try out multiple formulations. That can take days. When I hear the right note that sets me off, and from then on I repeatedly rewrite as I go. If I take a wrong turning or come to dead end I either find a ‘fix’ or cut back the story and rewrite. I don’t dash off an initial plot-driven draft and then revise later because the story grows slowly, organically, out of the words on the page.

Q: What fires you up? Who do you read – and why?

A: I’m inspired by the broad sweep of Robert Lowell’s poetry, the mysteries of ordinary life and sheer quirkiness of Carol Shields and Anne Tyler, the singularity of Marilynne Robinson’s vision, and the depth, power and complexity of James Joyce and Virginia Woolf.

Q: How much of your personal life went into your latest book?

A: Violet’s picture of a late-life love affair was adapted from my first meeting with my wife and children’s author, Sue Hampton. The love story soon develops its own fictional dynamic, but part two is based on supporting a sick friend – although this section focuses on the spiritual and psychological impact of long-term illness, rather than the physical details.

Q: Why do you write?

A: I wrote ‘Violet’ for the same reason I write anything – because I want to develop a strong authorial voice capable of ‘looking inside’ modern relationships and holding up a mirror to the society around, while retaining a feeling flow that comes naturally (despite all the rewriting) and transports the readers to places only fiction can take them.

In the UK, you can buy signed copies of ‘Violet’ at https://leslietate.com/shop/violet/

The ebook of Violet is available here: Violet by Leslie Tate (eBook)

Reviews:

Violet is a captivating novel narrated through letters, diary entries, instant messages, poems, and other writings that create a multi-textured depth to the storyline. Leslie Tate’s fluid, musical sentence structure, vivid use of imagery and description, and skilful storytelling bring to life a memorable protagonist in the character of Beth Jarvis, an imaginative and sensitive woman. A pleasure to read! Beth Copeland, Pushcart Prize nominated poet & winner of the Dogfish Head Poetry Prize

Leslie Tate has a beautiful turn of phrase and this work is threaded with elegant descriptive passages. The central characters are instantly likeable, and the reader has a quick and affectionate bond that hooks right from the opening pages. – Dawn Finch Trustee, Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) Children’s Writer & Librarian.

The third, free-standing part of Leslie Tate’s trilogy opens with a thoroughly modern scenario: Beth, a middle-aged woman, sits in a restaurant waiting for her first meeting with James, a man of similar vintage with whom hitherto she has exchanged letters and phone conversations.

From that point on, Violet becomes timeless. Events and relationships could be from almost any era. Beth herself is a weaver of stories; the possibility is hard to dismiss that the whole thing is in Beth’s head. In places the author hints as much: “In fact, I could almost say we imagined who we were.”

There’s a dream-like quality to the painstaking precision of much of the description of places, events and conversations. Beth’s love stories – with Conrad first and, in her fifties, with James, are somewhat stylised. “Right from the start we chose to be in love,” she says of James, and there are echoes of Tristan and Isolt, Abelard and Heloise in their story.

Beth punctuates her musings about her men, her families, her illness – in short, about her life – with stories in various forms. Some are contributed by others, some are her own, some are reports of dreams. Beth suggests that the theme of her story is love, but I’d say it’s imagination: where it comes from and what purpose it might serve. In Violet, it gives full value. – David Guest, author and journalist.

At the heart of Violet, there is Beth, a divorced mother of two grown daughters and owner of a café, and there is James, previously married and with two adult children of his own. They are together, right from the opening pages, though in fact the paths of these two characters only intersected later in their lives. Theirs is a passionate love story.

The breadth of Violet is found not in its narrative scope—it is a personal tale with a limited cast of characters—but in how far it reaches inward, and outward. Symbolism and allegory abound, as Beth and James push the boundaries of their connection. They are the couple who dance among the flowers, with or without music, at times literally dancing words. They are the couple who have arrived at a place where the waiting ends.

Told in voices both living and posthumous, Violet is a celebration of the numinous, and a paean to life and love. With James at her side, and in spite of the all-consuming struggles she faces, Beth chooses to embrace a path that is “wild and windy and crazy”, along which the smallest experiences are acts of worship; a world that pulses with life and magic and joy. Michelle Payette-Daoust, blogger, bi-linguist and teacher 

Violet is the final instalment of Leslie Tate’s Lavender Blues trilogy. It chronicles the passionate later-in-life relationship of Beth and James. A simple love story? Think again. From the very first scene, a childhood story of Beth’s, entitled The Girl who Began Again, we are given a sense that this story will be something unique. We move straight from the childhood story, to an adult Beth sitting in a restaurant with a sheaf of letters sent to her by James. We learn that the pair have been corresponding and talking by telephone and that this would be their first date. Not a bad introduction.

After their successful first date, Tate eschews traditional story telling techniques by going backwards, over the series of pre-dated letters that have led to this point in the story. I wasn’t initially sure about this strategy, surely it would have made more sense to have the letters before the date? However, though the unorthodox decision does quench some of the initial dramatic tension, the letters themselves are fascinating. The move an invitation for the reader to abandon all pre-conceived ideas of what a novel ‘should’ involve.

After divesting us of our expectations, Tate then moves the narrative back and forth between Beth’s childhood and her evolving relationship with James. The various chapters are quirky and unorthodox involving text messages, dialogues without attributions, dreams, stories and poetry, giving one a sense that we are reading not so much a novel, as a real-life scrapbook of someone’s life. Particularly effective are the scenes from Beth’s early courtship with her first husband, an evangelical church minister, juxtaposed against the playfulness and indeed sacredness of her burgeoning relationship with James.

In part two, we skip forward six years, to a series of diary entries in Beth’s first-person narrative voice. She is married to James by this stage and I had similar reservations about the loss of dramatic tension as we looked back over their early struggles as a married couple. Despite this, I found part two the warmest and most endearing part of the novel. Beth is ill, the reader soon learns, her simple diary entries a chronicle of a couple coming to terms with a terminal illness. Their struggles, are chronicled in a quirky, unorthodox manner, which I’m beginning to recognise as Tate’s signature style. There is a loveliness to Beth’s simple spirituality, evoking all that is best in a life of faith. Their return to the rocky headland of their courtship concludes this section in a deeply symbolic manner.

Part three, opens with a letter written by James who is now in deep mourning. It is followed by some third person reflections of the community and then, what can only be described as series of affecting vignettes and stories from the perspective of the recently departed (or is she?) Beth. This section brought the metaphor of a scrapbook forcefully back to me. Perhaps, because I have only just planned a funeral, I was mindful of the fragmentary nature of our recollections. How one person can be different things to different people. How it is only when we pull them together that we can form a complete picture of their life. Which is sacred, in all of its phases, as Beth’s story was. This, I think, is the triumph of Tate’s novel. – Elizabeth Jane Corbett – Bristol Short Story Prize winner and author of The Tides Between.

Leslie’s website: https://leslietate.com/

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In the UK, you can buy signed copies of the first novel in the trilogy, ‘Purple’, at: https://leslietate.com/shop/purple/

Amazon UK has ‘Purple’ as an ebook and in paperback at:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Purple-Courtship-Generation-Lavender-Shades-ebook/dp/B0163F2ESQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1515681453&sr=8-1&keywords=purple+leslie+tate

Blue front cover

You can buy signed copies of ‘Blue’ in the UK at: https://leslietate.com/shop/blue/

Amazon UK has paperback copies of ‘Blue’ at: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Blue-Lavender-Blues-Leslie-Tate/dp/1910094420/ref=sr_1_cc_2?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1515681685&sr=1-2-catcorr&keywords=blue+leslie+tatehttps://www.amazon.co.uk/Blue-Lavender-Blues-Leslie-Tate/dp/1910094420/ref=sr_1_cc_2?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1515681685&sr=1-2-catcorr&keywords=blue+leslie+tate

front cover Heavens Rage

You can buy signed copies of Leslie’s trans memoir ‘Heaven’s Rage’ in the UK at https://leslietate.com/shop/heavens-rage/

Amazon UK has paperback copies of ‘Heaven’s Rage’ at https://www.amazon.co.uk/Heavens-Rage-Leslie-Tate-ebook/dp/B01N9EA5RP/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1515679913&sr=8-1&keywords=heaven%27s+Rage+Leslie+Tate

Bio:

Leslie Tate studied Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia and has been shortlisted for the Bridport, Geoff Stevens and Wivenhoe Prizes. He’s the author of the trilogy of novels ‘Purple’, ‘Blue’ and ‘Violet’, as well as his trans memoir ‘Heaven’s Rage’, which has been turned into a film. Leslie runs a mixed arts show in Berkhamsted, UK, where he lives with his wife, multi-talented author Sue Hampton.

Well, that certainly piqued my interest… what about you? Do comment below.

Bye for now, you know me…. I’m

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Leslie is a member of our thriving Authors/Bloggers Rainbow Support Club, to find out more please visit the following link: Authors Bloggers Rainbow Support Club

My Social Media:

Authors Website: https://mjmallon.com

Collaborative blog: https://sistersofthefey.wordpress.com

Twitter: @Marjorie_Mallon and @curseof_time

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/17064826.M_J_Mallon

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mjmallonauthor/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mjmallonauthor/

Tumblr: http://mjmallonauthor.tumblr.com/

 

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The Bloggers Bash Blog Post Competition 2018: The Queen’s Dress Down Day

Blog-Post-Competition

 

Here’s my cheeky entry to the Bloggers Bash Blog Post Competition 2018, sorry your majesty!

The Queen’s forehead creased in worry, she’d had enough, so many engagements, accompanied by endless rounds of champagne, canapes and caviar.

She turned to her trusted adviser, ‘Dear fellow,’ she enquired, ‘Could you help me? I’d like to be a commoner for the day, to ride a double-decker bus full of beer swilling pensioners, purchase a sale bra and cheap stone-washed jeans. Oh, and I’d like to get to the lowly department store via a rusty old bike.’

Her adviser’s jaw dropped as if she had asked him whether he picked his very large nose.

He wandered off, or hid she wasn’t sure. She contemplated chopping his head off but decided against it. Instead, she turned to Google to find an answer. A wonderful site proposed A Royal Dress Down Day with a difference plus a Royal surprise. She squealed with delight. Her corgis hid under the bed in shock. She sighed; even her dogs were turning against her!

She squinted at the small print. The Dress Down Day promised a Fairy Godmother, a basic bra fit, a guarantee of poor service plus a cup of strong builder’s tea to wash down her disappointment. She signed a special disclaimer to say she wouldn’t complain.

The day loomed, Elizabeth was so excited! But, being a commoner wasn’t as great as she thought it would be. The Fairy Godmother turned out to be a little girl in a tutu who kept on whining. Instead of riding on a bike she had to get to the department store via an over populated ocean on a jet ski, and the pair of jeans clung to her body like a clinging wetsuit.

All very inappropriate for a woman of her age. She picked up her diamond tiara. Back to business as usual.

 

If you want to enter the competition you better get your skates on, tomorrow is the last day!

http://sachablack.co.uk/2018/03/04/the-bloggers-bash-blog-post-competition-extended-sundayblogshare-bloggersbash/

 

 

 

 

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Colleen Chesebro’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #Cinquain #Poetry #5lines

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The prompt words this week are Renew and Fresh. I chose to use improve for renew and shocking for fresh.

The idea for this particular Cinquain came from a recent critique session at Cambridge writers. I’d submitted the first draft of my prologue for Book Two. Not everyone is a fan of prologues so the comments were kind of… make it shorter…. so short it would be tiny. Dare I make it a four, five line prologue?  Anyone got any advice on tiny prologues?

I wrote this Cinquain with that in mind:

Copy of Cinquain

 

 

https://colleenchesebro.com/2018/03/06/colleens-weekly-tanka-tuesday-poetry-challenge-no-74-renew-fresh-snyonymsonly/

Hope you enjoyed my Cinquain…

Happy writing!

Bye for now,

 

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Link to buy: http://myBook.to/TheCurseofTime

Authors Website: https://mjmallon.com
Collaborative blog: https://sistersofthefey.wordpress.com
Twitter: @Marjorie_Mallon and @curseof_time

Facebook Authors/Bloggers Support Group:

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Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mjmallonauthor/
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