The Making of A Novel: Love’s Register by Leslie Tate #romantic #love #climatechange

I’m pleased to welcome Leslie Tate to Kyrosmagica. I featured Leslie previously at the time of the blog tour for Violet. You can read more about that here, along with links to some of Leslie’s other books: Blue, Purple, and Heaven’s Rage.

Leslie’s latest book, Love’s Register, will be published in October and you can pre-order a signed copy here.

Love’s Register

THE MAKING OF A NOVEL
Leslie Vs Leslie: a self-interview, discussing Leslie’s latest novel, Love’s Register:
What’s special about Love’s Register?
For starters, it’s longer than three novels put together. And it’s full-on, exploring the love lives of four UK generations. It also covers the climate emergency and how it affects young people today. It’s ambitious, but very much about the characters.
Does that mean it’s a character-led book?
(Leslie smiles) Yes and no. Because it’s also driven by language and location. So I’ve given the characters their own voices, the language is literary but down-to-earth, and the scenes on N.E. beaches contrast with London and York. Taken together, they create mood, voice and incident.


In that case, why’s there a picture of Tahiti on the cover?
Ah, that’s about climate. The book’s last protagonist, Hereiti, comes from Tahiti.
She’s a professor and a climate activist and gives a Ted-type Talk about Oceania going under.
Right, now we’ve got the general idea, can you tell us about how you approach writing a story like that?
(Leslie switches on the computer) Certainly. To begin with, I sit down at the screen and try out words. At first my mind’s blank and I have to resist the temptation to do something else or simply give up. But I know from experience that I have to keep trying – usually for hours. If I do any pre-planning it’s most likely to come from a random stimulus. By that I mean, for example, if I’m out walking and see someone or a place that connects with my past I might think “Ah, that’s the start of a story.” But when I get home if I try to ‘translate’ that into words I’ll end up with a long list of phrases, nothing else. To get anywhere I have to start writing and see what happens – which can be frustrating because the words can’t be given orders, and don’t necessarily come out the way you want.
But aren’t you in charge – I mean, don’t you steer the story as it develops?
Light-touch steering, I’d say.  With lots of turnarounds, backtracking and changes in direction. That way, what happens comes as a surprise to me and the reader, So it’s a kind of improv – but heavily doctored afterwards. It has to be plausible but significant – and take you places you don’t normally go.
Sounds like hard work. But how do you know when you’ve hit gold and got the final version?
You never do – at least I don’t. A novel’s always in progress, but of course you do get a feeling of closure when it comes together. “Ah,” you say to yourself, “that’s how it gels!” Even then, the ‘rules’ of the novel aren’t fixed so it can be hard to know what fits, especially as anything ground-breaking is likely to sound strange at first.  So there’s a degree of necessary discomfort about any book that aims to be ‘new and original, not seen before’. That’s the dictionary definition, by the way, of the word novel!
Nice. Now, going back to Love’s Register, how have you linked the different people together?


They’re all part of the Lavender Family tree.
You mean it’s a family saga?
Well, it’s quite selective. So the storytellers are Joe, Mia and Cass plus Matthew Lavender and later, Richard Lavender – but also Mary Hammond and Beth Jarvis.
So – my last attempt to pin you down – is it a character-based historical fiction?
(Leslie laughs) Not completely. Because it’s a modern psychological novel that focuses on individual scenes. What you get is more of a social portrait. We catch the family at key moments, skipping the boring parts in between.


OK, to end the interview, how about an extract?
Certainly. I’ll make it short. The story moves back and forth between voices. This is the last entry for the Lavender children, Joe, Mia and Cass:
Joe, Mia and Cass were in a quiz show.
“What makes the world go round?” asked Joe. He was the quiz master, dressed in joggers and a rainbow jacket. “You have three minutes to answer,” he added, placing an upended egg timer on the table. The sand began to run.
“Is it money?” asked Mia. She was wearing an animal-print tunic over black leggings.
“What do you think?”
“Well I know climate deniers can’t think of anything else. They’re culty, like Midas. And remember what happened to him.”
“The addict’s punishment, eh?”
“I’m guessing money’s not the answer.”
“No, money’s out. So, what makes the world go round?”
“You want the science?” asked Cass, who was wearing a white lab coat.

“Yes, if we can. But remember, we’re on countdown.” Joe checked the timer. The sand in the bottom chamber was piling up. It seemed to be alive.
“OK. It’s about gravity,” Cass replied. “The Earth’s like an ice skater pulling in her arms to spin faster. That’s been going on a long time.”
“Ah, but is it spotting as it turns?” asked Joe.
“That’s what’s called anthropomorphism,” said Cass.
“Gravity, you just hold me down so quietly,” sang Mia.
“The question remains open,” said Joe. “Any takers?” He took off his jacket to reveal his printed T-shirt. In the centre was an hourglass in a circle.
“Is it wishful thinking?” asked Mia.
“Good try. But you know what they say. Be careful what you wish for…”
“Got it! Everyone knows, LOVE makes the world go round,” said Mia
“That’s half the answer,” replied Joe. He checked the timer. In the top part, the sand had caved in. It was draining fast.
Mia pointed to the T-shirt. “You’re not thinking of the ten-year warning?”
Joe shook his head. “No. In any case the latest science says it could be much sooner.”
Mia clapped her hands. “I know,” she said, “it’s LOVE AND RAGE.”
“Correct,” called Joe.
As Mia jazz-handed, the last few grains of sand trickled through. She looked from Joe to Cass. “Can we begin again?” she asked.
“We don’t really know,” Joe replied.
“But it could be difficult,” her sister added. She pointed to the timer. The bottom half was full and the top was empty. Realising the quiz was over Joe, Mia and Cass fell silent.
They were out of time.


ABOUT THE BOOK: Love’s Register tells the story of romantic love and climate
change over four UK generations. Beginning with ‘climate children’ Joe, Mia and Cass and ending with Hereiti’s night sea journey across Oceania, the book’s voices take us through family conflicts in the 1920s, the pressures of the ‘free-love 60s’, open relationships in the feminist 80s/90s and a contemporary late-life love affair.
Love’s Register is a family saga and a modern psychological novel that explores the way we live now. Due out mid/end-October, you can pre-order your signed copy here
https://leslietate.com/shop/loves-register/ .
BIO: Leslie Tate is an ex-student of the UEA Creative Writing Course, and the author of six novels. Leslie’s website https://leslietate.com/ offers book and personal information plus weekly interviews with creative and community-involved people.

Wishing Leslie much success with Love’s Register. Such an important topic – climate change and one which we all must be so mindful of.

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Blog Tour for ‘Violet’ by Leslie Tate

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A big welcome to my guest Leslie… author of the trilogy of novels ‘Purple’, ‘Blue’ and ‘Violet’, as well as his trans memoir ‘Heaven’s Rage.’

VIOLET – THE INSIDE STORY

Violet Front Cover

When I interview authors on my blog https://leslietate.com/ about their new novel I usually begin with who they are, a few words about their new title, then questions about what kind of writing they do. I follow up with how their life experiences have contributed to their book, how it changed in the making, and why they’ve written it. I’m just as interested in the process as the result, so I might include questions about their writing habits, what fires them up and who they read and why.

I interview a wide range of people, not just authors. So I talk to musicians, artists, filmmakers, publishers, comedians, care-givers and people with disabilities or mental health issues – anyone who has to use imagination in one form or another to get by. I want to learn about them as people and how the act of doing something difficult has changed them, in themselves and in their view of the world. I also want to grasp the inflow and outflow of energy and imagination as well as the hard graft that went into what they’re creating.

So, with the tables turned, interviewing myself (as authors do, turning snatches of fantasy and overheard voices into polished monologues) – can I deliver even half of what I hope to get from them?

It’s a bit like playing God, but here goes…

Q: What’s your writing history?

A: I studied Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia, I’ve been shortlisted for the Bridport, Geoff Stevens and Wivenhoe Prizes and I’m the author of the trilogy of novels ‘Purple’, ‘Blue’ and ‘Violet’, as well as my trans memoir ‘Heaven’s Rage’, which has been turned into a film.

Q: Tell us about your latest book.

A: The blurb for my recently-published novel ‘Violet’ runs like this: ‘The passionate, late-life love of Beth and James begins in 2003 on a blind date in a London restaurant. Attracted by James’s openness, Beth feels an immediate, deep connection between his honesty and her own romantic faith. From then on they bond, exchanging love-texts, exploring sea walks and gardens and sharing their past lives with flashbacks to Beth’s rural childhood and her marriage to a dark, charismatic minister…’

Q: What kind of writing do you do?

A: My published writing is about the changing patterns of modern love. It grows out of language – I constantly search for the right word to guide me to the next. My plots develop from the characters: what they say, how they interact and what lies deepest inside them.

Q: How do you approach the task of writing a novel?

A: When I write, I need to find the exact turn of phrase to get started. So I listen carefully as I try out multiple formulations. That can take days. When I hear the right note that sets me off, and from then on I repeatedly rewrite as I go. If I take a wrong turning or come to dead end I either find a ‘fix’ or cut back the story and rewrite. I don’t dash off an initial plot-driven draft and then revise later because the story grows slowly, organically, out of the words on the page.

Q: What fires you up? Who do you read – and why?

A: I’m inspired by the broad sweep of Robert Lowell’s poetry, the mysteries of ordinary life and sheer quirkiness of Carol Shields and Anne Tyler, the singularity of Marilynne Robinson’s vision, and the depth, power and complexity of James Joyce and Virginia Woolf.

Q: How much of your personal life went into your latest book?

A: Violet’s picture of a late-life love affair was adapted from my first meeting with my wife and children’s author, Sue Hampton. The love story soon develops its own fictional dynamic, but part two is based on supporting a sick friend – although this section focuses on the spiritual and psychological impact of long-term illness, rather than the physical details.

Q: Why do you write?

A: I wrote ‘Violet’ for the same reason I write anything – because I want to develop a strong authorial voice capable of ‘looking inside’ modern relationships and holding up a mirror to the society around, while retaining a feeling flow that comes naturally (despite all the rewriting) and transports the readers to places only fiction can take them.

In the UK, you can buy signed copies of ‘Violet’ at https://leslietate.com/shop/violet/

The ebook of Violet is available here: Violet by Leslie Tate (eBook)

Reviews:

Violet is a captivating novel narrated through letters, diary entries, instant messages, poems, and other writings that create a multi-textured depth to the storyline. Leslie Tate’s fluid, musical sentence structure, vivid use of imagery and description, and skilful storytelling bring to life a memorable protagonist in the character of Beth Jarvis, an imaginative and sensitive woman. A pleasure to read! Beth Copeland, Pushcart Prize nominated poet & winner of the Dogfish Head Poetry Prize

Leslie Tate has a beautiful turn of phrase and this work is threaded with elegant descriptive passages. The central characters are instantly likeable, and the reader has a quick and affectionate bond that hooks right from the opening pages. – Dawn Finch Trustee, Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) Children’s Writer & Librarian.

The third, free-standing part of Leslie Tate’s trilogy opens with a thoroughly modern scenario: Beth, a middle-aged woman, sits in a restaurant waiting for her first meeting with James, a man of similar vintage with whom hitherto she has exchanged letters and phone conversations.

From that point on, Violet becomes timeless. Events and relationships could be from almost any era. Beth herself is a weaver of stories; the possibility is hard to dismiss that the whole thing is in Beth’s head. In places the author hints as much: “In fact, I could almost say we imagined who we were.”

There’s a dream-like quality to the painstaking precision of much of the description of places, events and conversations. Beth’s love stories – with Conrad first and, in her fifties, with James, are somewhat stylised. “Right from the start we chose to be in love,” she says of James, and there are echoes of Tristan and Isolt, Abelard and Heloise in their story.

Beth punctuates her musings about her men, her families, her illness – in short, about her life – with stories in various forms. Some are contributed by others, some are her own, some are reports of dreams. Beth suggests that the theme of her story is love, but I’d say it’s imagination: where it comes from and what purpose it might serve. In Violet, it gives full value. – David Guest, author and journalist.

At the heart of Violet, there is Beth, a divorced mother of two grown daughters and owner of a café, and there is James, previously married and with two adult children of his own. They are together, right from the opening pages, though in fact the paths of these two characters only intersected later in their lives. Theirs is a passionate love story.

The breadth of Violet is found not in its narrative scope—it is a personal tale with a limited cast of characters—but in how far it reaches inward, and outward. Symbolism and allegory abound, as Beth and James push the boundaries of their connection. They are the couple who dance among the flowers, with or without music, at times literally dancing words. They are the couple who have arrived at a place where the waiting ends.

Told in voices both living and posthumous, Violet is a celebration of the numinous, and a paean to life and love. With James at her side, and in spite of the all-consuming struggles she faces, Beth chooses to embrace a path that is “wild and windy and crazy”, along which the smallest experiences are acts of worship; a world that pulses with life and magic and joy. Michelle Payette-Daoust, blogger, bi-linguist and teacher 

Violet is the final instalment of Leslie Tate’s Lavender Blues trilogy. It chronicles the passionate later-in-life relationship of Beth and James. A simple love story? Think again. From the very first scene, a childhood story of Beth’s, entitled The Girl who Began Again, we are given a sense that this story will be something unique. We move straight from the childhood story, to an adult Beth sitting in a restaurant with a sheaf of letters sent to her by James. We learn that the pair have been corresponding and talking by telephone and that this would be their first date. Not a bad introduction.

After their successful first date, Tate eschews traditional story telling techniques by going backwards, over the series of pre-dated letters that have led to this point in the story. I wasn’t initially sure about this strategy, surely it would have made more sense to have the letters before the date? However, though the unorthodox decision does quench some of the initial dramatic tension, the letters themselves are fascinating. The move an invitation for the reader to abandon all pre-conceived ideas of what a novel ‘should’ involve.

After divesting us of our expectations, Tate then moves the narrative back and forth between Beth’s childhood and her evolving relationship with James. The various chapters are quirky and unorthodox involving text messages, dialogues without attributions, dreams, stories and poetry, giving one a sense that we are reading not so much a novel, as a real-life scrapbook of someone’s life. Particularly effective are the scenes from Beth’s early courtship with her first husband, an evangelical church minister, juxtaposed against the playfulness and indeed sacredness of her burgeoning relationship with James.

In part two, we skip forward six years, to a series of diary entries in Beth’s first-person narrative voice. She is married to James by this stage and I had similar reservations about the loss of dramatic tension as we looked back over their early struggles as a married couple. Despite this, I found part two the warmest and most endearing part of the novel. Beth is ill, the reader soon learns, her simple diary entries a chronicle of a couple coming to terms with a terminal illness. Their struggles, are chronicled in a quirky, unorthodox manner, which I’m beginning to recognise as Tate’s signature style. There is a loveliness to Beth’s simple spirituality, evoking all that is best in a life of faith. Their return to the rocky headland of their courtship concludes this section in a deeply symbolic manner.

Part three, opens with a letter written by James who is now in deep mourning. It is followed by some third person reflections of the community and then, what can only be described as series of affecting vignettes and stories from the perspective of the recently departed (or is she?) Beth. This section brought the metaphor of a scrapbook forcefully back to me. Perhaps, because I have only just planned a funeral, I was mindful of the fragmentary nature of our recollections. How one person can be different things to different people. How it is only when we pull them together that we can form a complete picture of their life. Which is sacred, in all of its phases, as Beth’s story was. This, I think, is the triumph of Tate’s novel. – Elizabeth Jane Corbett – Bristol Short Story Prize winner and author of The Tides Between.

Leslie’s website: https://leslietate.com/

Purple cover front_300 (1)

In the UK, you can buy signed copies of the first novel in the trilogy, ‘Purple’, at: https://leslietate.com/shop/purple/

Amazon UK has ‘Purple’ as an ebook and in paperback at:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Purple-Courtship-Generation-Lavender-Shades-ebook/dp/B0163F2ESQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1515681453&sr=8-1&keywords=purple+leslie+tate

Blue front cover

You can buy signed copies of ‘Blue’ in the UK at: https://leslietate.com/shop/blue/

Amazon UK has paperback copies of ‘Blue’ at: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Blue-Lavender-Blues-Leslie-Tate/dp/1910094420/ref=sr_1_cc_2?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1515681685&sr=1-2-catcorr&keywords=blue+leslie+tatehttps://www.amazon.co.uk/Blue-Lavender-Blues-Leslie-Tate/dp/1910094420/ref=sr_1_cc_2?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1515681685&sr=1-2-catcorr&keywords=blue+leslie+tate

front cover Heavens Rage

You can buy signed copies of Leslie’s trans memoir ‘Heaven’s Rage’ in the UK at https://leslietate.com/shop/heavens-rage/

Amazon UK has paperback copies of ‘Heaven’s Rage’ at https://www.amazon.co.uk/Heavens-Rage-Leslie-Tate-ebook/dp/B01N9EA5RP/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1515679913&sr=8-1&keywords=heaven%27s+Rage+Leslie+Tate

Bio:

Leslie Tate studied Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia and has been shortlisted for the Bridport, Geoff Stevens and Wivenhoe Prizes. He’s the author of the trilogy of novels ‘Purple’, ‘Blue’ and ‘Violet’, as well as his trans memoir ‘Heaven’s Rage’, which has been turned into a film. Leslie runs a mixed arts show in Berkhamsted, UK, where he lives with his wife, multi-talented author Sue Hampton.

Well, that certainly piqued my interest… what about you? Do comment below.

Bye for now, you know me…. I’m

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Leslie is a member of our thriving Authors/Bloggers Rainbow Support Club, to find out more please visit the following link: Authors Bloggers Rainbow Support Club

My Social Media:

Authors Website: https://mjmallon.com

Collaborative blog: https://sistersofthefey.wordpress.com

Twitter: @Marjorie_Mallon and @curseof_time

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/17064826.M_J_Mallon

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mjmallonauthor/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mjmallonauthor/

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