Book Review: P.S. I Forgive You: A Broken Legacy by D. G Kaye #Memoir #Family #Mother #Daughter

Goodreads synopsis:

“I hurt for her. She wasn’t much of a mother, but she was still my mother.”

Confronted with resurfacing feelings of guilt, D.G. Kaye is tormented by her decision to remain estranged from her dying emotionally abusive mother after resolving to banish her years ago, an event she has shared in her book Conflicted Hearts. In P.S. I Forgive You, Kaye takes us on a compelling heartfelt journey as she seeks to understand the roots of her mother’s narcissism, let go of past hurts, and find forgiveness for both her mother and herself.

After struggling for decades to break free, Kaye has severed the unhealthy ties that bound her to her dominating mother—but now Kaye battles new confliction, as the guilt she harbors over her decision only increases as the end of her mother’s life draws near. Kaye once again struggles with her conscience and her feelings of being obligated to return to a painful past she thought she left behind.

My review:

This is a very personal account of the author’s experiences of coping and coming to terms with the emotions experienced after the death of a narcissistic mother. D. G Kaye’s mother is herself a product of the terrible parenting she experienced as a child. My own mother struggled with many heartbreaking problems as she grew up. She overcame these and was and continues to be a wonderfully caring mother. I have a deep, unbreakable bond with her which I also have with my daughters.

As I continued to read further into this memoir I kept on comparing our circumstances. How sad and damaging such an uncaring, selfish parent is to her children. How can a mother behave in such a way? P.S. I Forgive You is an important read for all of us. This memoir is about letting go, releasing the emotional turmoil which began in childhood.

It is a compelling read. It courageously deals with the extremes of family relationships. Relationships are complex and difficult, even in what I would deem to be ‘normal’ families. There are many who struggle to understand or relate to their son or daughter, sister, brother, wife or husband.

But this memoir takes those problems to a whole new level that no one should have to experience. After such a damaging upbringing, D. G. Kaye has suffered but has learnt to forgive. She lives a happy, fulfilled life. That is a wonderful testament to her strength of character and her can do attitude.

My recommendation: Read this. 5 stars. I’d highly recommend this memoir to us all whatever our circumstances. Also read the first book in the series: Conflicted Hearts.

Authors Website: http://www.dgkayewriter.com

Authors Twitter: pokercubster

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Marje @ Kyrosmagica

Hi. Welcome to my blog: M J Mallon - Kyrosmagica Publishing. A blog about magic, books, writing, laughter, and much more! I'm a debut writer, my first YA fantasy novel The Curse of Time - Book 1 - Bloodstone is set in Cambridge. I write book reviews on my blog and on Goodreads. I have a penchant for travel and have relatives in far flung places, Australia, Malaysia, and Singapore, (my birthplace.) I grew up in in Bonnie Scotland, in Edinburgh, and now live in Cambridge. I love sunny, hot places, particularly Rome, Venice, Portugal, Barcelona, and I forgot to mention the sun drenched beaches of the Caribbean, how could I? I am lucky to have been blessed with two lovely daughters and a husband who I fondly refer to in this blog as my black sheep. Family joke! With my passion for travel, culture, beautiful beaches, good food, books, theatre, writing, and humour, I hope to keep you entertained. I'm loving every minute of this creative journey, please join me.

23 thoughts on “Book Review: P.S. I Forgive You: A Broken Legacy by D. G Kaye #Memoir #Family #Mother #Daughter”

  1. Excellent review, Marje. Who knows what awaits us at birth? Innocent pawns, we are given either a short, medium or full-sized straw. And good luck either smiles or frowns on us. To have two bad parents is bad news, and even to have one – as in Debby’s case. must be a huge trial. I was undoubtedly lucky with both parents, and used to feel terribly sad for any child that wasn’t. It’s to Debby’s credit that she worked her way through the difficult times and writing about it, must have been cathartic Hugs xx

    1. Yes I agree it shows great strength of character to rise above such painful struggles in the way Debby has. I’ve got two lovely parents so count myself lucky. We have our tiffs but that’s all. It’s good that she broke the circle of such behaviour. Otherwise it could have continued and caused more heartbreak. Hugs to you Joy. Xx

  2. Thanks so much for this lovely surprise Marje. You dug deep and got to the essence. Like I say in all my memoirs, there are only 2 ways to come out of dysfunct – follow what you know, or get educated and get out. Glad I chose the latter. ❤ Also, you know I'm having tech probs til I get a new laptop. This old clunker doesn't play nice with WP – it won't let me 'like' or sign in with WP for comment. I think it's using Google to let me comment. What a mess! ❤

    1. My pleasure Debby. Yes, take a better path. My mum chose to do that too. She had a rough old time (her mother disappeared when she was little,) but that’s another story for another time. Yes sorry to hear about your laptop problems mine has been annoying recently. Hope you get a new, well behaving one soon!

      1. Thanks so much Marje. Just found out laptop not coming til 14th. May have to throw in the towel 🙁 xx Maybe one day you will write about your mum’s life xx

  3. This is a compelling review, Marje. My mother also faced some very difficult times, including when my father died when I was three months old. She is a great mother despite the problems she experienced. So sad for Debby to have a mother like she did.

    1. Thank you Robbie. Oh that’s terrible about your father. How sad. My mums mother disappeared when she was very young and she had s very hard time if it. But like your mum she’s always been a wonderful mum. Poor Debby.

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