Book Review: P.S. I Forgive You: A Broken Legacy by D. G Kaye #Memoir #Family #Mother #Daughter

Goodreads synopsis:

“I hurt for her. She wasn’t much of a mother, but she was still my mother.”

Confronted with resurfacing feelings of guilt, D.G. Kaye is tormented by her decision to remain estranged from her dying emotionally abusive mother after resolving to banish her years ago, an event she has shared in her book Conflicted Hearts. In P.S. I Forgive You, Kaye takes us on a compelling heartfelt journey as she seeks to understand the roots of her mother’s narcissism, let go of past hurts, and find forgiveness for both her mother and herself.

After struggling for decades to break free, Kaye has severed the unhealthy ties that bound her to her dominating mother—but now Kaye battles new confliction, as the guilt she harbors over her decision only increases as the end of her mother’s life draws near. Kaye once again struggles with her conscience and her feelings of being obligated to return to a painful past she thought she left behind.

My review:

This is a very personal account of the author’s experiences of coping and coming to terms with the emotions experienced after the death of a narcissistic mother. D. G Kaye’s mother is herself a product of the terrible parenting she experienced as a child. My own mother struggled with many heartbreaking problems as she grew up. She overcame these and was and continues to be a wonderfully caring mother. I have a deep, unbreakable bond with her which I also have with my daughters.

As I continued to read further into this memoir I kept on comparing our circumstances. How sad and damaging such an uncaring, selfish parent is to her children. How can a mother behave in such a way? P.S. I Forgive You is an important read for all of us. This memoir is about letting go, releasing the emotional turmoil which began in childhood.

It is a compelling read. It courageously deals with the extremes of family relationships. Relationships are complex and difficult, even in what I would deem to be ‘normal’ families. There are many who struggle to understand or relate to their son or daughter, sister, brother, wife or husband.

But this memoir takes those problems to a whole new level that no one should have to experience. After such a damaging upbringing, D. G. Kaye has suffered but has learnt to forgive. She lives a happy, fulfilled life. That is a wonderful testament to her strength of character and her can do attitude.

My recommendation: Read this. 5 stars. I’d highly recommend this memoir to us all whatever our circumstances. Also read the first book in the series: Conflicted Hearts.

Authors Website: http://www.dgkayewriter.com

Authors Twitter: pokercubster

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Book Review: The New Asylum: a memoir of psychiatry

Goodreads Synopsis:

The New Asylum is the third volume in a series of free-verse poetry anthologies and personal memoirs from Australian author Frank Prem (Small Town Kid, Devil In The Wind).

This collection is an exposé of life in the public psychiatric system, spanning five decades and describing sometimes graphically, sometimes ironically, often poignantly, and always honestly, a search for meaning in extraordinary and often incomprehensible circumstances.

The journey begins with childhood experiences of watching immigrant parents earn their living in the Mayday Hills Mental Asylum… progresses through the oddities and antics of psychiatric nurse training in the 1970s… on to the high-pressure coalface of managing regional centres facing an inundation of modern urban challenges… and finally, settles into the generally calmer waters of a small town residential facility.

Join Frank Prem on his New Asylum journey, and discover what it means to become that particular ‘mental health creature’ that is a psychiatric nurse.

 

My review:

I have the utmost respect for those who work with mental health patients. It must be one of the most challenging jobs to be a psychiatric nurse. The relentless and at times hopelessness of such an experience is delivered in poetic form in this memoir with a wry mixture of sadness, melancholy and just the right amount of humour. The free style verse is a perfect stylistic choice for this type of memoir.

Frank Prem’s poetry delivers a powerful punch – I also enjoyed Devil in The Wind: https://mjmallon.com/2019/06/17/book-review-of-devil-in-the-wind-by-frank-prem-poetry-blacksaturday-wildfires/

My rating of The New Asylum: 5 stars. #highlyrecommended

 

Buy Book: myBook.to/TheCurseofTime

Social Media Links

Authors Websitehttps://mjmallon.com
Collaborative Bloghttps://sistersofthefey.wordpress.com
Twitter: @Marjorie_Mallon and @curseof_time
#ABRSC: Authors Bloggers Rainbow Support Club on Facebook
Goodreadshttps://www.goodreads.com/author/show/17064826.M_J_Mallon

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mjmallonauthor/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mjmallonauthor/

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Carrot Ranch Rodeo Contest #2: Memoir – The Winning Entries and My Flash #Rollercoasters

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Well done to all the winners and to all the participants for joining in.

Here is the link to the winning entries: https://carrotranch.com/2018/11/16/rodeo-2-memoir-winners/

Here’s my entry which was inspired by a true life event – overcoming my fear of rollercoasters and taking my one and only ride with my two young daughters. I’ve never been on a rollercoaster since (and have no intention of so doing,) but the memory has stayed firmly in my mind as a massive accomplishment.

A true triumph over fear!

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It’s a gut-wrenching fear of mine: Roller-coasters, a grim holding on, tempting death. Sometimes you have to face your fears and deal with them. I’m proud of the ride in Portugal. I was with my family, my two daughters and my husband. I had to be brave, and I was. I’ve got the photo to prove it but never ask me to do it again! Not now, not ever. It was a once in a lifetime moment, one I’ll treasure forever. But I still imagine what could have happened and an author’s imagination is the most dangerous, evil ride.

 

It’s no wonder that wicked old roller-coasters feature in my writing. You’ll have to read the second novel in The Curse of Time series to see what I am talking about! I’m still working on that.. I’m around the 70,000 word mark!

 

Buying link: http://mybook.to/TheCurseofTime
Unique Selling Point: Unique, Imaginative, ‘Charming, enchanting and richly layered this is purely delightful.’

“This delightful book will appeal to teens and young adults who love stories filled with magical crystals, dark family curses, and mysteries waiting to be solved around every corner. Each chapter leads you on a journey of discovery where Amelina earns the right to use three wizard stones to reset the balance of time and finally break the curse that holds her family hostage. A captivating tale!” – Colleen M. Chesebro (Editor)

Social Media:

Authors Website: https://mjmallon.com
Collaborative blog: https://sistersofthefey.wordpress.com
Twitter: @Marjorie_Mallon and @curseof_time
Facebook Authors/Bloggers Support Group:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1829166787333493/
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/17064826.M_J_Mallon
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mjmallonauthor/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mjmallonauthor/
Tumblr: http://mjmallonauthor.tumblr.com/

Sponsor of Carrot Ranch Literary Community 

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Buying Link: http://mybook.to/TheCurseofTime

M J Mallon _ YA Author

 

 

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#Review #Education I Am Malala: The Story of the Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban

 

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Goodreads Synopsis:

I come from a country that was created at midnight When I almost died it was just after midday. .When the Taliban took control of the Swat Valley in Pakistan. one girl spoke out. Malala Yousafzai refused to be silenced and fought for her right to an education.On Tuesday. October 9. 2012. when she was fifteen. she almost paid the ultimate price. She was shot in the head at point-blank range while riding the bus home from school. and few expected her to survive.Instead. Malalas miraculous recovery has taken her on an extraordinary journey from a remote valley in northern Pakistan to the halls of the United Nations in New York. At sixteen. she became a global symbol of peaceful protest and the youngest nominee ever for the Nobel…

 

I don’t tend to read memoirs so this is rare for me. Perhaps, I picked this up because of circumstance. I was with my daughter in Topping and Company bookshop in Ely when I chanced upon this book. My daughter Natasha had been looking for travel guides as she’d just accepted a graduate teaching job in South Korea teaching English As A Foreign Language.  This got me thinking about the power of education. If she had no education, she couldn’t have hoped to get such a job. With little or no education, her chances of travel and a good job would be limited. How powerful education is in shaping our future and our response to other people. Education helps us reach our goals and broadens our outlook, experience and enjoyment of life. That is why I bought this book. Education should be at the forefront of all we do. Education is the bedrock. Education is liberating. Education rocks. 

My review 

I Am Malala is a book that everyone should read regardless of their gender, age, or religion. It is informative,  moving, and inspiring. Malala’s bravery shines through and there are wonderful examples of her selflessness. I cried in several places; I smiled too. I loved the special bond between Malala and her father, (especially touching and rare given some of the anecdotes that illustrate how women are treated as second class citizens with no voice, education or power.)  I enjoyed reading about her family, her fights with her brothers and how her mother grew stronger and more confident too. More than anything I loved the message about education – how it should be available to all regardless of gender. I loved the bravery of this fifteen-year-old to stand up for what she believed in even if that meant risking such terrible danger.

Malala is an extraordinary young woman and an amazing role model, I am so glad I picked this biography up.

Goodreads Bio:

Malala Yousafzai is a Pakistani activist for female education and the youngest-ever Nobel Prize laureate. She is known for human rights advocacy, especially education of women in her native Swat Valley in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, northwest Pakistan, where the local Taliban had at times banned girls from attending school. Her advocacy has since grown into an international movement.

Link: https://www.malala.org/

 

DISCLAIMER: “As of 13th September 2017 we are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.”  

My opinions are my own and any reviews on this site have not been swayed or altered in any way by monetary compensation, or by the offer of a free book in exchange for a review. 

Buying Links: 

Amazon Kindle UK Edition: http://amzn.to/2whb54Q

Amazon Kindle Paperback: http://amzn.to/2k0hxvt

Amazon Kindle Hardback: http://amzn.to/2htEimU

Have you read Malala’s memoir? If you have I’d love to hear your opinion.

Bye for now,

Bitmoji hittin the books

 

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My social media links:

Authors/Bloggers Rainbow Support Club on Facebook
Twitter: @curseof_time

Instagram

Facebook

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Fellow Administrators of our Authors Bloggers Rainbow Support Club #ABRSC on Facebook, myself, my good friends Colleen Chesebro and Debby Gies. Click on Colleen’s and Debby’s photos to be directed to their awesome blogs. These ladies rock!

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Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 31 – PEACE & TEAR

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My entry to Colleen’s weekly poetry challenge this week is inspired by a piece I am editing for Dan Alatorre’s Word Weaving Competition.

It is taken from a part completed memoir I’ve written of my dad’s early childhood before the Second World War, including his travelling adventures to the Far East, Middle East, Pacific region, Caribbean and Africa. This is a short nostalgic paragraph about him lamenting the loss of the forests that he used to play in plus a poem about the same subject using the words peace and tear.

Before the Second World war children used to play in extensive woodland. This treasured land is now an estate of houses, which encroach upon the sloping fields leading further and further into the now diminishing wood.  Yes, land is at a premium, and builders build property upon every spare inch of space – forget about the Thousand Acre Wood, it’s more like postage stamp wood.

I think Eeyore would have this to say: ‘Here today and gone tomorrow.’

The once wooded area has now become a permanent car park for the nearby primary school, built well after the war.

Today, there is just one sorry playground, a tiny place for local children to play in among the houses. It sits like a sad apology to the past.

In my childhood, I remember a veritable playground of fields, marshy land, and hedgerows, where children dawdled for hours playing cowboys and Indians and Doctors and Nurses. One of my favourite childhood pastimes was to construct a pretend shelter with my pals. A local woman would inspect the shelter and play along with our game with a serious air.

Nowadays, children play with manufactured games, watch TV, engage in computer activities, and twiddle with their mobile phones, oh how the world has changed!

This freedom meant that during the war years we would play in  strange places, some of which weren’t at all safe. The concept of health and safety didn’t exist! Nowadays children can’t even get a work experience placement without going through a minefield of paperwork, which is a sorry state of affairs if you ask me.

Children enjoyed the simple pleasures of life, such as collecting cigarette and royal navy cards. Though, some weren’t so innocent, one lad with the same name as me took great pleasure in bullying his parents and the poor unfortunate cat.  He would set the cat’s tail alight. His parents appeared terrified of him. He behaved like a vandal before vandalism become popular. This bully never bothered me, on the contrary, he encouraged me to stay around. I concluded that he enjoyed an audience for his daily wickedness!  I would play with many boys, but none so infamous as Gavin Vernon who stole the stone of Scone  from Westminster Abbey on Christmas day 1950!

© Marjorie Mallon 2017 – aka, Kyrosmagica. All Rights Reserved.

We kill in peacetime,Forests to make way for homes,Tearing down the past.No one seems to care but m

If you’d like to join in the challenge:

https://colleenchesebro.com/2017/04/25/colleens-weekly-poetry-challenge-31-peace-tear/

 

Bye for now,

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The 3 Day Quote Challenge – Day 1 – Jeannette Winterson

Thank you to Swagata Mukherjee from Kolkata, India who nominated me to take part in the 3 day Quote challenge.

Swagata is a PhD student in Physics who loves to travel and is passionate about photography.

Here’s a link to her blog: https://physicsswagata.wordpress.com/2015/08/07/3-day-quote-challenge-day-33/

I’ve been a bit slow in taking up this particular challenge what with one thing and another. I do hope to finish the challenge on Saturday but if I’m a day or two late I’m sure you’ll forgive me.

Thereafter I’m taking a bit of a blogging break, partly for a holiday, and also to help my mum out (she’s in hospital at the moment undergoing an operation.) So I’ll be donning my Florence Nightingale gloves and doing my daughterly best. I’ve just heard that she’s out of the operating theatre, so my anxiety levels are now back on an even keel. Goodness I’ve been stressed today, my leg was shaking earlier on in the day when I was driving. Somehow this is a million times more stressful than when I went in myself for an operation, that was nothing compared to this, this is my mum, so it’s not surprising that I’ve been worried. I tell you it’s been a strange day,  I could write a massive blog post about it but I might be better to save that for later………..

The 3 Day Quote Challenge has been a great diversion for me as I needed something to take my mind off my mum’s operation.

I’m going to kick start this challenge by celebrating books, where would we be without them? Yes they work wonders, especially on stressful days.

This quote from Jeannette Winterson says it so succinctly, books are a home, a warm inviting home, a special place that only you the reader can imagine.  Each reader has their own individual experience when they open up a book, and that is what makes books so brilliant and magical.

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“Books, for me, are a home. Books don’t make a home – they are one, in the sense that just as you do with a door, you open a book, and you go inside. Inside there is a different kind of time and space. there is warmth there too – a hearth. I sit down with a book and I am warm.”

Jeannette Winterson.

Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?

Courtesy of Goodreads:

Jeanette Winterson’s bold and revelatory novels have earned her widespread acclaim, establishing her as a major figure in world literature. She has written some of the most admired books of the past few decades, including her internationally best-selling first novel, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, the story of a young girl adopted by Pentecostal parents that is now often required reading in contemporary fiction classes.

Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal? is a memoir about a life’s work to find happiness. It’s a book full of stories: about a girl locked out of her home, sitting on the doorstep all night; about a religious zealot disguised as a mother who has two sets of false teeth and a revolver in the dresser, waiting for Armageddon; about growing up in a north England industrial town now changed beyond recognition; about the universe as a cosmic dustbin. It is the story of how a painful past, which Winterson thought she had written over and repainted, rose to haunt her later in life, sending her on a journey into madness and out again, in search of her biological mother. It’s also a book about other people’s literature, one that shows how fiction and poetry can form a string of guiding lights, a life raft that supports us when we are sinking.

Witty, acute, fierce, and celebratory, Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal? is a tough-minded search for belonging–for love, identity, home, and a mother.

 

It sounds good doesn’t it? Haven’t read this yet…..

Oops forgot to add the rules, hastily adding this in now!

Rules for Three-Day Quote Challenge

  • Thank the blogger, who nominated you.
  • Publish 3 quotes on 3 consecutive days in your blog. It can be your own, or from a book, movie or from anyone who inspires you.
  • Nominate 3 more bloggers to carry on this endeavour.

I’ve decided to nominate some bloggers from #BlogBattle Rachael Ritchey’s Weekly writing battle.

My nominations:

http://rachaelritchey.com/

https://darrenscanlon.wordpress.com/

https://phoenixgrey85.wordpress.com/

Feel free to take part in the challenge or not the choice is yours.

Thanks for stopping by today, do leave a comment.

 

I’d love to hear your opinion on Jeannette Winterson’s quote. Oh and if you’ve read the memoir do say, I’d love to hear your thoughts….

kk

Marje @ Kyrosmagica xx

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