Writer’s Quote Wednesday – Ruth Ozeki

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It’s Writer’s Quote Wednesday, via Colleen at Silver Threading.

Here’s the link to her blog if you’d like to join in her open invitation to take part in Writer’s Quote Wednesday: http://silverthreading.com/2015/06/24/writers-quote-wednesday-silver-inspiration/

Well, what’s my quote going to be about this week?

Something very important, and precious. It’s a tiny word but it means so much, it holds so much potential in its four simple letters: LIFE. So make sure that word reaches the stars, take it travelling, sightseeing, swimming, partying, dancing, laughing, hoola-hooping, theatre-going, cinema fancying, eating. Take it whenever and wherever you want to go, don’t leave it at home sulking. Let it enjoy the company of friends, and family, challenge that word to do things it never thought would be possible. That word is all there is and all that matters. Keep it Entertained! Nurtured! Loved! Happy! Smiling!

“Life is fleeting. Don’t waste a single minute of your precious life. Wake up now! And now! And now!”

Ruth Ozeki. A Tale for the Time Being.

Well, one line says it all, Ruth Ozeki is absolutely spot on. One life –  live it to the full – don’t squander a single minute. Live it Right now!  And Now! And Now! And Now!

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About Ruth Ozeki (taken from her website):

Ruth Ozeki is a novelist, filmmaker, and Zen Buddhist priest.

Her first two novels, My Year of Meats (1998) and All Over Creation (2003), have been translated into 11 languages and published in 14 countries.

Her most recent work, A Tale for the Time-Being (2013), was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and will be published in over thirty countries. 

Ruth’s documentary and dramatic independent films, including Halving the Bones, have been shown on PBS, at the Sundance Film Festival, and at colleges and universities across the country.

A longtime Buddhist practitioner, Ruth ordained in 2010 and is affiliated with the Brooklyn Zen Center and the Everyday Zen Foundation.

She lives in British Columbia and New York City.

http://www.ruthozeki.com/

I wrote a review for A tale for the time being way back when I had just started reviewing books.

Here’s the link to my 5 star mini review of A tale for the time being: https://mjmallon.com/2014/05/09/my-review-of-a-tale-for-the-time-being-by-ruth-ozeki/

 

Thanks for coming by. Come again soon.

Leave a comment I’d love it if you do.

kk

Kyrosmagica xx

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My Kyrosmagica review of A tale for The Time Being by Ruth Ozeki

anzr-square-400 A Tale for the time being

Goodreads Synopsis:

This is Ruth Ozeki’s third novel, shortlisted for The Man Booker Prize 2013.

In Tokyo, sixteen-year-old Nao has decided there’s only one escape from her aching loneliness and her classmates’ bullying, but before she ends it all, Nao plans to document the life of her great-grandmother, a Buddhist nun who’s lived more than a century. A diary is Nao’s only solace—and will touch lives in a ways she can scarcely imagine.

Across the Pacific, we meet Ruth, a novelist living on a remote island who discovers a collection of artifacts washed ashore in a Hello Kitty lunchbox—possibly debris from the devastating 2011 tsunami. As the mystery of its contents unfolds, Ruth is pulled into the past, into Nao’s drama and her unknown fate, and forward into her own future. 

Full of Ozeki’s signature humour and deeply engaged with the relationship between writer and reader, past and present, fact and fiction, quantum physics, history, and myth, A Tale for the Time Being is a brilliantly inventive, beguiling story of our shared humanity and the search for home.

My review:

I think this is a remarkable novel, well deserved to be shortlisted for The Man Booker Prize 2013. It is the first time that I have awarded a book five stars. For me it ticked all of the boxes, it is beautifully written. The character of Nao comes alive through the reading of her diary, drawing you into her world, where the brutality of some of the things she has to endure is counterbalanced by the spiritual guidance and love she receives from Old Jiko, her great grandmother. You can’t help but share in Ruth’s determination to find out what has happened to Nao and her family. The novel left me with a heightened sense of the here and now, as each person’s individual destiny can be altered, in a single moment, that’s all it takes to destroy lives. Equally the same moment in time may have no consequences if influenced by a different set of circumstances. It also left me feeling a bit sad and strangely optimistic at the same time too. If you like to think deeply, this is definitely the novel for you. I expect that I will return to this novel in the future and re-read it again, because one reading just doesn’t seem to do it justice.

My rating:

5 Stars

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https://www.goodreads.com/review/list/20419289-m-mallon

Have you read A tale for The Time Being? Do leave a comment I’d love to hear from you.

Bye for now,

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Marje @ Kyrosmagica xx

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