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“To have memories, happy or sorrowful, is a blessing, for it shows we have lived our lives without reservation.”
Twan Eng Tan, The Gift of Rain 

 

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This is a fabulous quote from Twan Eng Tan.  I loved The Gift of Rain and would definitely like to read more of Twan Eng Tan’s novels.

Here’s a link to my review of The Gift of Rain: https://kyrosmagica.wordpress.com/2015/04/13/my-kyrosmagica-review-of-the-gift-of-rain-by-tan-twan-eng/

Do I agree with Twan Eng Tan’s quote?

Yes I believe I do, life isn’t a steady uneventful path, there are many difficult and painful things that happen to us along the way that perhaps we would have preferred not to have experienced but these difficulties, and setbacks make us who we are today. Equally those happy, trouble free times are there to remind us that life is truly worth living.

Author’s Bio (Courtesy of Goodreads)

Tan Twan Eng was born in 1972 in Penang, but lived in various places in Malaysia as a child. He studied law at the University of London and later worked as lawyer in one of Kuala Lumpur’s most reputable law firms. He also has a first-dan ranking in aikido and is a strong proponent for the conservation of heritage buildings.

Tan Twan Eng talked about his background, his second novel, and his writing process in a May 2012 interview live-tweeted by BooksLiveSA from a literary festival in Franschhoek, South Africa. His hometown is Penang, Malaysia, and he received a law degree there. He said being a lawyer helped him be organized, disciplined, and meticulous, and that lawyers have to craft stories. While he grew up with Malay, Hokkien, and English spoken at home, the author said he thinks and dreams in English. Currently he writes full time, splitting his time between Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Cape Town, South Africa. His first novel, The Gift of Rain, set in Penang during World War II was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 2007. His second novel, The Garden of Evening Mists (2012), which opens just after World War II, is written from the perspective of a female judge and involves three cultures: Malay, Japanese, and South African. The author says his third novel will be set in China.

Note: In traditional Chinese style, the family name precedes the given name(s). Tan is the author’s family name, Twan Eng his given names. Some authors choose to anglicize their names for the purposes of publishing in English, so that their family name appears on the book cover last not first, others such as Tan Twan Eng don’t.

If you’d like to join in Colleen’s Writer’s Quote Wednesday here’s the link: http://silverthreading.com/2015/07/29/writers-quote-wednesday-diana-galbadon/

Hope you liked this week’s quote for Writer’s Quote Wednesday.

Do leave a comment I’d love to hear from you.

 

kk

Marje @ Kyrosmagica xx

 

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