Writer’s Quote Wednesday: Sara Raasch Snow Like Ashes

060915_1859_writersquot1

Yes, it’s another  Writer’s Quote Wednesday, via my blogging pal Colleen over at SilverThreading. If you’d like to join in the fun here’s the link: http://silverthreading.com/2015/08/12/writers-quote-wednesday-roald-dahl/

The quote I’m going to feature this week is about the shivers, yes, wicked cold, a freezing dose of torture that gets right into your unsuspecting bones and just settles there. I hate the cold, my body just doesn’t like it, not one bit. My skin does this weird puckering thing, it squeezes itself into defensive mode and starts to resemble an orange, (without the bright colour I hasten to add,) yes crinkly peel skin that’s what I have when it’s cold. It’s not a look I’d recommend! On top of that I get chilblains on my feet, oh, and joy of joys last year I even managed to find a few of these beauties appearing on my hands. UGH…!!!!

So when I read this particular passage in Snow Like Ashes, I shivered a lot, can you imagine an orb of eternal winter? Eek,well if that’s on the cards, I’d wish for no long for some of that Winterian blood flowing in my veins! Yes a Winterian blood transfusion that’s what I’d be needing!

frozen-201495__180

 

“It’s so cold that foreigners have to wrap in layers of fur to walk from building to building, while our natural Winterian blood keeps us warm even in the worst conditions. And snow is everywhere, always, so much that the grass beneath it is white from lack of sun. An entire kingdom wrapped in an orb of eternal winter.”
Sara Raasch, Snow Like Ashes      

Here’s the Goodreads synopsis:

 A heartbroken girl. A fierce warrior. A hero in the making.

Sixteen years ago the Kingdom of Winter was conquered and its citizens enslaved, leaving them without magic or a monarch. Now, the Winterians’ only hope for freedom is the eight survivors who managed to escape, and who have been waiting for the opportunity to steal back Winter’s magic and rebuild the kingdom ever since.

Orphaned as an infant during Winter’s defeat, Meira has lived her whole life as a refugee, raised by the Winterians’ general, Sir. Training to be a warrior—and desperately in love with her best friend, and future king, Mather — she would do anything to help her kingdom rise to power again.

So when scouts discover the location of the ancient locket that can restore Winter’s magic, Meira decides to go after it herself. Finally, she’s scaling towers, fighting enemy soldiers, and serving her kingdom just as she’s always dreamed she would. But the mission doesn’t go as planned, and Meira soon finds herself thrust into a world of evil magic and dangerous politics – and ultimately comes to realize that her destiny is not, never has been, her own.

To follow Sara Raasch on Tumblr: http://sararaasch.tumblr.com/

My review of Snow Like Ashes: https://mjmallon.com/2014/12/30/my-kyrosmagica-review-of-snow-like-ashes-by-sara-raasch/

Thanks for stopping by for Writer’s Quote Wednesday. Hope you liked the quote, and my whingeing about the cold. Sometimes it’s good to have a good old moan, gets it out of your system! Now I feel all hot and toasty!

Do you love or hate the cold? Do leave a comment and let me know.

kk

Marje @ Kyrosmagica xx

Advertisements
Sharing Options:

Writer’s Quote Wednesday: Twan Eng Tan

060915_1859_writersquot1

“To have memories, happy or sorrowful, is a blessing, for it shows we have lived our lives without reservation.”
Twan Eng Tan, The Gift of Rain 

 

zugspitze-400295_640

 

This is a fabulous quote from Twan Eng Tan.  I loved The Gift of Rain and would definitely like to read more of Twan Eng Tan’s novels.

Here’s a link to my review of The Gift of Rain: https://mjmallon.com/2015/04/13/my-kyrosmagica-review-of-the-gift-of-rain-by-tan-twan-eng/

Do I agree with Twan Eng Tan’s quote?

Yes I believe I do, life isn’t a steady uneventful path, there are many difficult and painful things that happen to us along the way that perhaps we would have preferred not to have experienced but these difficulties, and setbacks make us who we are today. Equally those happy, trouble free times are there to remind us that life is truly worth living.

Author’s Bio (Courtesy of Goodreads)

Tan Twan Eng was born in 1972 in Penang, but lived in various places in Malaysia as a child. He studied law at the University of London and later worked as lawyer in one of Kuala Lumpur’s most reputable law firms. He also has a first-dan ranking in aikido and is a strong proponent for the conservation of heritage buildings.

Tan Twan Eng talked about his background, his second novel, and his writing process in a May 2012 interview live-tweeted by BooksLiveSA from a literary festival in Franschhoek, South Africa. His hometown is Penang, Malaysia, and he received a law degree there. He said being a lawyer helped him be organized, disciplined, and meticulous, and that lawyers have to craft stories. While he grew up with Malay, Hokkien, and English spoken at home, the author said he thinks and dreams in English. Currently he writes full time, splitting his time between Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Cape Town, South Africa. His first novel, The Gift of Rain, set in Penang during World War II was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 2007. His second novel, The Garden of Evening Mists (2012), which opens just after World War II, is written from the perspective of a female judge and involves three cultures: Malay, Japanese, and South African. The author says his third novel will be set in China.

Note: In traditional Chinese style, the family name precedes the given name(s). Tan is the author’s family name, Twan Eng his given names. Some authors choose to anglicize their names for the purposes of publishing in English, so that their family name appears on the book cover last not first, others such as Tan Twan Eng don’t.

If you’d like to join in Colleen’s Writer’s Quote Wednesday here’s the link: http://silverthreading.com/2015/07/29/writers-quote-wednesday-diana-galbadon/

Hope you liked this week’s quote for Writer’s Quote Wednesday.

Do leave a comment I’d love to hear from you.

 

kk

Marje @ Kyrosmagica xx

 

Sharing Options:

Writer’s Quote Wednesday: Terri Guillemets

060915_1859_writersquot1

Welcome to Writer’s Quote Wednesday an open invitation from Colleen at Silver Threading to join in the fun.

Here’s a link to her blog: http://silverthreading.com/2015/07/15/writers-quote-wednesday-ann-patchett/

This week I’ve had a go playing around on one of the photo editing sites that Colleen recommends: http://www.picmonkey.com/

It seems easy to use, so thanks for the great tip Colleen.

gold-629286__180

If I fall asleep with a pen in my hand, don’t remove it I might

be writing in my dreams.

Terri Guillemets.

narrative-794978__180

Just love this quote from Terri Guillemets.

Writing whilst dreaming! That would really be something. Can you imagine how wonderful your writing would be!  Dreams can be such a wonderful source of inspiration, especially if you have very elaborate, and exciting dreams!

About Terri Guillemets from her website Quotegarden:

Terri Guillemets is a quotation anthologist from Phoenix, Arizona who has collected quotes since age thirteen. Her passion is sharing literary, inspirational, thought-provoking, and humorous quotations with a worldwide audience via her website The Quote Garden at www.quotegarden.com, one of the most long-standing online quotation collections and the first to offer a wide variety of special occasion topics. With a specialty in reviving vintage writings from the 1800s, she shares her love of old books, the art of writing, and the beauty of words with a personal, heartfelt approach — “spreading quotatious joy” as she calls it. A curmudgeonesque optimist whose inner child will never grow up, she also enjoys nature, photography, cloudgazing, and family.

Thanks for joining me for Writer’s Quote Wednesday. Hope you dream some wonderful dreams, come share some here if you’d like.

 

kk

 

Marje @ Kyrosmagica xx

Sharing Options:

Writer’s Quote Wednesday: Isaac Asimov

060915_1859_writersquot1

If you haven’t discovered this weekly open invitation from Colleen over at Silver Threading here’s the link: http://silverthreading.com/2015/07/15/writers-quote-wednesday-ann-patchett/

What do I have in mind for Writer’s Quote Wednesday?

Let’s see, ah this has to be the one:

“If my doctor told me I had only six minutes to live, I wouldn’t brood. I’d type a little faster.”
― Isaac Asimov

Absolutely! It’s a bit crazy! What dedication.  Get those words down fast!

Of course I do hope that none of us get the six minutes to live message but if the worse case scenario does happen then there is always the option to get typing….

What else can you possibly do in six minutes? Eat something I suppose. That would rate quite highly on my list of things to do. Sit in the sun. Another great option. Yes, what about type and eat in a sunny market stall in Malaysia? The ultimate fast food delight, freshly cooked satay, and a notebook to get down my final words. Ah, yes perfection.

Well this is the second Isaac Asimov quote that has captured my attention for Writer’s Quote Wednesday, there seems to be a bit of a pattern going on here.

I’m a bit of a fan of Isaac Asimov’s quotes! Yes most definitely.

About:

Isaac Asimov was a Russian-born, American author, a professor of biochemistry, and a highly successful writer, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books.

Professor Asimov is generally considered the most prolific writer of all time, having written or edited more than 500 books and an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards. He has works published in nine of the ten major categories of the Dewey Decimal System (lacking only an entry in the 100s category of Philosophy).

Asimov is widely considered a master of the science-fiction genre and, along with Robert A. Heinlein and Arthur C. Clarke, was considered one of the “Big Three” science-fiction writers during his lifetime. Asimov’s most famous work is the Foundation Series; his other major series are the Galactic Empire series and the Robot series, both of which he later tied into the same fictional universe as the Foundation Series to create a unified “future history” for his stories much like those pioneered by Robert A. Heinlein and previously produced by Cordwainer Smith and Poul Anderson. He penned numerous short stories, among them “Nightfall”, which in 1964 was voted by the Science Fiction Writers of America the best short science fiction story of all time, a title many still honor. He also wrote mysteries and fantasy, as well as a great amount of nonfiction. Asimov wrote the Lucky Starr series of juvenile science-fiction novels using the pen name Paul French.

Most of Asimov’s popularized science books explain scientific concepts in a historical way, going as far back as possible to a time when the science in question was at its simplest stage. He often provides nationalities, birth dates, and death dates for the scientists he mentions, as well as etymologies and pronunciation guides for technical terms. Examples include his Guide to Science, the three volume set Understanding Physics, and Asimov’s Chronology of Science and Discovery.

Asimov was a long-time member and Vice President of Mensa International, albeit reluctantly; he described some members of that organization as “brain-proud and aggressive about their IQs” He took more joy in being president of the American Humanist Association. The asteroid 5020 Asimov, the magazine Asimov’s Science Fiction, a Brooklyn, NY elementary school, and two different Isaac Asimov Awards are named in his honor. (Via Goodreads)

Hope you like my chosen quote for Writer’s Quote Wednesday. What would you do if you only had a few minutes left on this earth?

Bye for now…… Remember each and every six minutes is precious…. Enjoy.

kk

Marje @ Kyrosmagica xx

Sharing Options:

Writer’s Quote Wednesday: Isaac Asimov

It’s Writer’s Quote Wednesday, via Colleen at Silver Threading.

Here’s the link to her blog if you’d like to join in her open invitation to take part in Writer’s Quote Wednesday: http://silverthreading.com/2015/06/24/writers-quote-wednesday-silver-inspiration/

 

dandelion-761556__180
It is the writer who might catch the imagination of young people, and plant a seed that will flower and come to fruition.
– Isaac Asimov

Such wonderfully inspiring words from Isaac Asimov. Let’s take this dandelion, blow gently and scatter its tiny but powerful seeds of creativity far and wide. If we can nurture the imagination of our youngsters then indeed we have achieved something worth celebrating.

Writing for children and young adults is so inspiring and exciting too. This is the age when there are so many possibilities, and opportunities for growth. That’s not to say that there aren’t a multitude of difficulties too, growing up is never easy, and the teenage years can be particularly challenging. So many issues can and do rear their heads, bullying, gender and sexuality, peer pressure, these are just some of the obvious ones that come to mind. But if we allow children and young people a chance to dream beyond their current capabilities then who knows what they can achieve? My husband is always saying, “Reach for the stars,” to my two daughters, it may sound a bit over the top but it’s such sound advice. Yes, reach for those twinkly stars!

Do what you love, follow your dreams, and enjoy life to the full. Those stars may seem far away but with hard work and dedication, encouragement and belief in yourself those stars may not be as far as you think.

DREAM BIG…….

 

girl-625353__180

About Isaac Asimov (Courtesy of Goodreads)

Isaac Asimov was a Russian-born, American author, a professor of biochemistry, and a highly successful writer, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books.

Professor Asimov is generally considered the most prolific writer of all time, having written or edited more than 500 books and an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards. He has works published in nine of the ten major categories of the Dewey Decimal System (lacking only an entry in the 100s category of Philosophy).

Asimov is widely considered a master of the science-fiction genre and, along with Robert A. Heinlein and Arthur C. Clarke, was considered one of the “Big Three” science-fiction writers during his lifetime. Asimov’s most famous work is the Foundation Series; his other major series are the Galactic Empire series and the Robot series, both of which he later tied into the same fictional universe as the Foundation Series to create a unified “future history” for his stories much like those pioneered by Robert A. Heinlein and previously produced by Cordwainer Smith and Poul Anderson. He penned numerous short stories, among them “Nightfall”, which in 1964 was voted by the Science Fiction Writers of America the best short science fiction story of all time, a title many still honor. He also wrote mysteries and fantasy, as well as a great amount of nonfiction. Asimov wrote the Lucky Starr series of juvenile science-fiction novels using the pen name Paul French.

Most of Asimov’s popularized science books explain scientific concepts in a historical way, going as far back as possible to a time when the science in question was at its simplest stage. He often provides nationalities, birth dates, and death dates for the scientists he mentions, as well as etymologies and pronunciation guides for technical terms. Examples include his Guide to Science, the three volume set Understanding Physics, and Asimov’s Chronology of Science and Discovery.

Asimov was a long-time member and Vice President of Mensa International, albeit reluctantly; he described some members of that organization as “brain-proud and aggressive about their IQs” He took more joy in being president of the American Humanist Association. The asteroid 5020 Asimov, the magazine Asimov’s Science Fiction, a Brooklyn, NY elementary school, and two different Isaac Asimov Awards are named in his honor.

 

Hope you enjoyed Writer’s Quote Wednesday.

Thanks for stopping by.

Please do leave a comment, I’d love to hear from you.

 

kk

Marje at Kyrosmagica xx

 

Sharing Options:

Writer’s Quote Wednesday – Ruth Ozeki

060915_1859_writersquot1

It’s Writer’s Quote Wednesday, via Colleen at Silver Threading.

Here’s the link to her blog if you’d like to join in her open invitation to take part in Writer’s Quote Wednesday: http://silverthreading.com/2015/06/24/writers-quote-wednesday-silver-inspiration/

Well, what’s my quote going to be about this week?

Something very important, and precious. It’s a tiny word but it means so much, it holds so much potential in its four simple letters: LIFE. So make sure that word reaches the stars, take it travelling, sightseeing, swimming, partying, dancing, laughing, hoola-hooping, theatre-going, cinema fancying, eating. Take it whenever and wherever you want to go, don’t leave it at home sulking. Let it enjoy the company of friends, and family, challenge that word to do things it never thought would be possible. That word is all there is and all that matters. Keep it Entertained! Nurtured! Loved! Happy! Smiling!

“Life is fleeting. Don’t waste a single minute of your precious life. Wake up now! And now! And now!”

Ruth Ozeki. A Tale for the Time Being.

Well, one line says it all, Ruth Ozeki is absolutely spot on. One life –  live it to the full – don’t squander a single minute. Live it Right now!  And Now! And Now! And Now!

graffiti-300350__180

About Ruth Ozeki (taken from her website):

Ruth Ozeki is a novelist, filmmaker, and Zen Buddhist priest.

Her first two novels, My Year of Meats (1998) and All Over Creation (2003), have been translated into 11 languages and published in 14 countries.

Her most recent work, A Tale for the Time-Being (2013), was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and will be published in over thirty countries. 

Ruth’s documentary and dramatic independent films, including Halving the Bones, have been shown on PBS, at the Sundance Film Festival, and at colleges and universities across the country.

A longtime Buddhist practitioner, Ruth ordained in 2010 and is affiliated with the Brooklyn Zen Center and the Everyday Zen Foundation.

She lives in British Columbia and New York City.

http://www.ruthozeki.com/

I wrote a review for A tale for the time being way back when I had just started reviewing books.

Here’s the link to my 5 star mini review of A tale for the time being: https://mjmallon.com/2014/05/09/my-review-of-a-tale-for-the-time-being-by-ruth-ozeki/

 

Thanks for coming by. Come again soon.

Leave a comment I’d love it if you do.

kk

Kyrosmagica xx

Sharing Options:

Writer’s Quote Wednesday: Ray Bradbury.

060915_1859_writersquot1

It’s Writer’s Quote Wednesday. I’d say that all you quote lovers out there should stop by Colleen’s blog, Silver Threading, to join in the fun. Here’s the link to her wonderful blog, which is choc-a-bloc full of all manner of interesting things: http://silverthreading.com/2015/06/17/writers-quote-wednesday-a-silver-quote/

Well, before I begin my chosen quote let me tell you what’s been happening here chez the Kyrosmagica household. Well, it’s been a bit busy recently. I’ve been sorting out our kitchen removing about eighty percent of its contents into boxes. No I’m not moving house, we’re having a kitchen makeover. My husband and I didn’t quite agree on this makeover business, I wanted a light touch up, you know nothing too crazy but he wanted to knock down walls and add patio doors. Guess who won in the end? Yes, I am a bit of a pushover. I just don’t like arguing. Anyway, that’s my little rant for the day. I’ll let you know how it goes, hopefully the house won’t fall down around my ears while I’m typing up my next blog post. If it does I’d just like to say, “it’s been sure nice to meet you guys.”

Right, back to Writer’s Quote Wednesday. I really love this quote from Ray Bradbury, particularly the lurking in libraries and climbing the stacks and sniffing books parts. Yes, I like a bit of crazy, so this appealed to me. As to writing every single day, yes, that’s most definitely the number one tip.

You must write every single day of your life… You must lurk in libraries and climb the stacks like ladders to sniff books like perfumes and wear books like hats upon your crazy heads… may you be in love every day for the next 20,000 days. And out of that love, remake a world.”
Ray Bradbury

And this quote is so touching too. It’s one of those quotes that just makes you feel as if you know Ray doesn’t it?

On the occasion of his 80th birthday in August 2000, Bradbury said, “The great fun in my life has been getting up every morning and rushing to the typewriter because some new idea has hit me. The feeling I have every day is very much the same as it was when I was twelve. In any event, here I am, eighty years old, feeling no different, full of a great sense of joy, and glad for the long life that has been allowed me. I have good plans for the next ten or twenty years, and I hope you’ll come along.”

Sadly Ray Bradbury died on June 5, 2012, at the age of 91 after a long illness.

Here’s some pictures that I hope Ray would have approved of :-

Here’s my fantasy perfume:

perfume-789816__180

Library:

Holz, Buch
Holz, Buch

Ladder:

artwork-797__180

Book:

narrative-794978__180

Ray Bradbury Biography via Goodreads:

American novelist, short story writer, essayist, playwright, screenwriter and poet, was born August 22, 1920 in Waukegan, Illinois. He graduated from a Los Angeles high school in 1938. Although his formal education ended there, he became a “student of life,” selling newspapers on L.A. street corners from 1938 to 1942, spending his nights in the public library and his days at the typewriter. He became a full-time writer in 1943, and contributed numerous short stories to periodicals before publishing a collection of them, Dark Carnival, in 1947.

His reputation as a writer of courage and vision was established with the publication of The Martian Chronicles in 1950, which describes the first attempts of Earth people to conquer and colonize Mars, and the unintended consequences. Next came The Illustrated Man and then, in 1953, Fahrenheit 451, which many consider to be Bradbury’s masterpiece, a scathing indictment of censorship set in a future world where the written word is forbidden. In an attempt to salvage their history and culture, a group of rebels memorize entire works of literature and philosophy as their books are burned by the totalitarian state. Other works include The October Country, Dandelion Wine, A Medicine for Melancholy, Something Wicked This Way Comes, I Sing the Body Electric!, Quicker Than the Eye, and Driving Blind. In all, Bradbury has published more than thirty books, close to 600 short stories, and numerous poems, essays, and plays. His short stories have appeared in more than 1,000 school curriculum “recommended reading” anthologies.

Ray Bradbury’s work has been included in four Best American Short Story collections. He has been awarded the O. Henry Memorial Award, the Benjamin Franklin Award, the World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement, the Grand Master Award from the Science Fiction Writers of America, the PEN Center USA West Lifetime Achievement Award, among others. In November 2000, the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters was conferred upon Mr. Bradbury at the 2000 National Book Awards Ceremony in New York City.

Ray Bradbury has never confined his vision to the purely literary. He has been nominated for an Academy Award (for his animated film Icarus Montgolfier Wright), and has won an Emmy Award (for his teleplay of The Halloween Tree). He adapted sixty-five of his stories for television’s Ray Bradbury Theater. He was the creative consultant on the United States Pavilion at the 1964 New York World’s Fair. In 1982 he created the interior metaphors for the Spaceship Earth display at Epcot Center, Disney World, and later contributed to the conception of the Orbitron space ride at Euro-Disney, France.

Married since 1947, Mr. Bradbury and his wife Maggie lived in Los Angeles with their numerous cats. Together, they raised four daughters and had eight grandchildren. Sadly, Maggie passed away in November of 2003.

Hope you enjoyed Writer’s Quote Wednesday. Do comment, it’s great to get feedback on my posts, and to hear your opinions. Come and say Hi.

Thanks for stopping by. I hope you come again soon!

kk

Kyrosmagica x

Sharing Options:

Writer’s Quote Wednesday: Dr Seuss

 

 

050515_2017_writersquot1

 

Welcome to my blog Kyrosmagica.

Join in the fun it’s time for  Writer’s Quote Wednesday http://silverthreading.com/2015/06/03/writers-quote-wednesday-douglas-Jerrold/

I haven’t been able to do much blogging this week I’ve been without internet for nearly a week, imagine that! I’ve been popping into the library to use free Wi-Fi when I can. So this post is a day out,  never mind, that seems quite appropriate given that this post is about Fantasy. Today as Dr. Seuss would say it’s Fox in Socks Day, (Wear Crazy Socks) Thursday instead of Green Eggs and Clothes day, (Wear something Green) Wednesday! Well of the two I prefer to wear crazy socks so a day late is lucky for me now I can wear some crazy socks! Yippeeeeeeeee!!!!!

Just recently I joined a reading group in Cambridge and one of the questions that we were asked was “Do we like fantasy?” I thought this was such an odd question, because for me all writing is a form of fantasy, unless the work in question is non-fiction. Fantasy is the thread that keeps our imagination nurtured, without it surely we will be at a terrible loss? Anyway to cut a long story short I was quite horrified when several people put up their hands indicating that they didn’t like fantasy.

If I was a cat I’d look something like this:

cat-633081__180

 

Who were these people? How can you not like fantasy? Did something terrible happen to them when they were children, so that they were unable to live and breathe fantasy?

So this week for Colleen’s Writer’s Quote Wednesday I’m going to focus on fantasy combined with a touch of humour now isn’t that a winning combination?

Definition of Fantasy:

the faculty or activity of imagining impossible or improbable things:
“his researches had moved into the realms of fantasy”
Look at those synonyms imagination, creativity, fancy, invention, originality, vision, come on what’s not to like?

Here’s a wonderful quote from a fellow I much admire, Dr. Seuss :

 

th4ODSYPW2

 

 

“I like nonsense, it wakes up the brain cells. Fantasy is a necessary ingredient in living. It’s a way of looking at life through the wrong end of a Telescope. Which is what I do, and that enables you to laugh at life’s realities.”

Dr. Seuss.

 

Author Profile – courtesy of Goodreads.

Theodor Seuss Geisel was born 2 March 1904 in Springfield, MA. He graduated Dartmouth College in 1925, and proceeded on to Oxford University with the intent of acquiring a doctorate in literature. At Oxford he met Helen Palmer, who he wed in 1927. He returned from Europe in 1927, and began working for a magazine called Judge, the leading humor magazine in America at the time, submitting both cartoons and humorous articles for them. Additionally, he was submitting cartoons to Life, Vanity Fair and Liberty. In some of his works, he’d made reference to an insecticide called Flit. These references gained notice, and led to a contract to draw comic ads for Flit. This association lasted 17 years, gained him national exposure, and coined the catchphrase “Quick, Henry, the Flit!”

In 1936 on the way to a vaction in Europe, listening to the rhythm of the ship’s engines, he came up with And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, which was then promptly rejected by the first 43 publishers he showed it to. Eventually in 1937 a friend published the book for him, and it went on to at least moderate success.

During WW II, Geisel joined the army and was sent to Hollywood. Captain Geisel would write for Frank Capra’s Signal Corps Unit (for which he won the Legion of Merit) and do documentaries (he won Oscar’s for Hitler Lives and Design for Death). He also created a cartoon called Gerald McBoing-Boing which also won him an Oscar.

In May of 1954, Life published a report concerning illiteracy among school children. The report said, among other things, that children were having trouble to read because their books were boring. This inspired Geisel’s publisher, and prompted him to send Geisel a list of 400 words he felt were important, asked him to cut the list to 250 words (the publishers idea of how many words at one time a first grader could absorb), and write a book. Nine months later, Geisel, using 220 of the words given to him published The Cat in the Hat, which went on to instant success.

In 1960 Bennett Cerf bet Geisel $50 that he couldn’t write an entire book using only fifty words. The result was Green Eggs and Ham. Cerf never paid the $50 from the bet.

Helen Palmer Geisel died in 1967. Theodor Geisel married Audrey Stone Diamond in 1968. Theodor Seuss Geisel died 24 September 1991.

Also worked under the pen name:
Theo Le Sieg

 

What about you do you feel fiercely protective of the fantasy world? Do you look at the world through the wrong end of a telescope? Do leave a comment.  I’d love to find out your opinions. Thanks for stopping by,  do come again I love visitors.

 

THIS BLOG claims no credit for any images posted on this site unless otherwise noted. Images on this blog are copyright to its respectful owners. If there is an image appearing on this blog that belongs to you and you do not wish for it to appear on this site, please contact or e-mail me with a link to said image and it will be promptly removed.

 

Sharing Options:

Writer’s Quote Wednesday: Bethany Hamilton

 

 

 

050515_2017_writersquot1

 

Here’s my post for Writer’s Quote Wednesday, if you’d like to participate too, here’s the link to Colleen’s blog: http://silverthreading.com/2015/05/27/writers-quote-wednesday-j-k-rowling/

I love the sea, and I would have loved to surf, so the story of Soul Surfer Bethany Hamilton really touched me.  On the 31st October 31, 2003, thirteen year old Bethany Hamilton was enjoying the waves  on Tunnels Beach, Kauai, with best friend Alana Blanchard, Alana’s father, Holt, and brother Byron. A tiger shark attacked Bethany severing her left arm just below the shoulder.  This terrible tragedy rather than curtailing her surfing career led her to inspiring surfing fans from all over the world. The first thing she asked after the surgery was “When can I surf again?” and just three weeks after this life threatening incident she returned to her board.

I learnt of her amazing story just this week whilst watching Soul Surfer on Netflix. This wonderfully inspiring film features an all-star cast, including Anna Sophia Robb and Helen Hunt, with Carrie Underwood in her film debut, and Dennis Quaid.

Here’s just one of many wonderful quotes from this remarkable woman:

“Life is a lot like surfing… When you get caught in the impact zone, you’ve got to just get back up. Because you never know what may be over the next wave.”

Taken from her autobiography:
Bethany Hamilton, Soul Surfer: A True Story of Faith, Family, and Fighting to Get Back on the Board    

th

Goodreads synopsis:

They say Bethany Hamilton has saltwater in her veins. How else could one explain the passion that drives her to surf? How else could one explain that nothing—not even the loss of her arm—could come between her and the waves? That Halloween morning in Kauai, Hawaii, Bethany responded to the shark’s stealth attack with the calm of a girl with God on her side. Pushing pain and panic aside, she began to paddle with one arm, focusing on a single thought: “Get to the beach….” And when the first thing Bethany wanted to know after surgery was “When can I surf again?” it became clear that her spirit and determination were part of a greater story—a tale of courage and faith that this soft-spoken girl would come to share with the world.

Soul Surfer is a moving account of Bethany’s life as a young surfer, her recovery after the attack, the adjustments she’s made to her unique surfing style, her unprecedented bid for a top showing in the World Surfing Championships, and, most fundamentally, her belief in God. It is a story of girl power and spiritual grit that shows the body is no more essential to surfing—perhaps even less so—than the soul.

 

 

And because I couldn’t just stick to one quote I had to include this one too:

0d659f73482ef8ca9ccdfdb08e364306

 

In 2004 Bethany won the ESPY Award for Best Comeback Athlete[7] and also received the Courage Teen Choice Award.

 

To finish off this heart-warming post what could be more wonderful that this:  on February 9, 2015, Bethany Hamilton and her husband announced that they were expecting their first child, a baby boy due in early June. Many congratulations to her, such an amazing role model, and a wonderful human being.

http://bethanyhamilton.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bethany_Hamilton

https://www.facebook.com/SurferBethanyHamilton?ref=br_rs

THIS BLOG claims no credit for any images posted on this site unless otherwise noted. Images on this blog are copyright to its respectful owners. If there is an image appearing on this blog that belongs to you and you do not wish for it to appear on this site, please contact or e-mail me with a link to said image and it will be promptly removed.

 

 

Sharing Options:

Writer’s Quote Wednesday – The Buddha

 

 

 

050515_2017_writersquot1

 

This Wednesday, I’m taking part in Writer’s Quote Wednesday @ Silverthreading.com.

http://silverthreading.com/2015/05/06/writers-quote-wednesday-the-Buddha/

The topic this week is Buddhism. The quote below simplifies life. There are only a few things that really matter, finding love, living life to the full, and letting go.

 

buddha-708490_640

 

 

“In the end,

These things matter most:
How well did you love?
How fully did you live?
How deeply did you let go?”

Gautama Buddha

About This Author (via Goodreads)

Gautama Buddha (Sanskrit: गौतम बुद्ध) born as Prince Siddhārtha (Sanskrit: सिद्धार्थ) was a spiritual teacher from the Indian subcontinent, on whose teachings Buddhism was founded.

Gautama is the primary figure in Buddhism, and accounts of his life, discourses, and monastic rules are believed by Buddhists to have been summarized after his death and memorized by his followers. Various collections of teachings attributed to him were passed down by oral tradition, and first committed to writing about 400 years later.

The time of Gautama’s birth and death is uncertain: most historians in the early 20th century dated his lifetime as circa 563 BCE to 483 BCE, but more recent opinion dates his death to between 486 and 483 BCE or, according to some, between 411 and 400 BCE. However, at a specialist symposium on this question held in 1988 in Göttingen, the majority of those scholars who presented definite opinions gave dates within 20 years either side of 400 BCE for the Buddha’s death, with others supporting earlier or later dates. These alternative chronologies, however, have not yet been accepted by all other historians.

Sharing Options: